WoodworkingPinRouting.Com
Welcome to another FREE Woodworking Resource sponsored by your fellow
woodworkers at Shopsmith

OVERARM PIN ROUTER
Setup and Features
Router Bits
Routing System Safety
Special Cautions on Materials & Techniques
Routing System Operations
Edging
Decorative Surface Cuts
Moldings
Mortising
Joinery
Duplicating
Building Fixtures
Repairing Furniture & Veneers
Fluting
Using Drill Press Vise to Hold Workpiece
Under Table Operations

Shopsmith Ovararm Pin Router
Click here for a printer friendly version of Tip-
Pg. 1-4, Pg 5-8, Pg 9-12, Pg 13-16, Pg 17-20, Pg 21-23

 

Joinery

Click to see larger view

Figure 22-27. Some of the structural joints that can be formed with the routing system. Click on image for larger view.

The overarm mode of the routing system is an excellent way to make a wide variety of structural joints for cabinets and furniture projects of all types (Figure 22-27).

The router bit's high operating speed allows it to make cuts that are cleaner than those produced by a table saw. And in some cases (like the mortise for a mortise and tenon), it will perform operations that simply cannot be done on the table saw.

Generally, most joints are formed by using un-piloted straight bits with the workpiece being guided by a fence, miter gauge and/or stops to control and limit the depths-of-cut. This capability provides the advantage of repetition, ensuring that every cut will be identical to the last.

As with other routing system operations, it's often best to back up the exit sides of through cross-grain cuts with scrap blocks (or to allow sufficient extra stock so that some can be removed after the initial cuts are made) to prevent unsightly tear-outs.

In some cases (such as square-cornered mortise and tenons), the corners of the joints will require squaring with a chisel after they've been cut. However, if you're producing a rounded mortise (which is perfectly acceptable in most cases), you'll have to round the ends of the matching tenon with a file or pocketknife to match the mortise. Another option is to cut the tenon shorter so its square corners will slip inside the rounded ends of the mortise.

Continue to Duplicating
Back to Mortising

Send For Your FREE Woodworking Fact Kit and "Sawdust Therapy" TV Show.

First Name*:
Last Name*:
Street Address*:
 
City*:
State*:
Zip*:
Country*:

USA Canada
Other

E-mail Address*:

  2009 Shopsmith Inc. All rights reserved.

Policies | Contact Us | Links | Corporate Web Site